Store your resources in your very own folder.

Sign in or sign up today!

Find out more

What does the Schools White Paper mean for you?

Add to My Folder
This item has 5 stars of a maximum 5

Rated 5/5 from 3 ratings (Write a review)

By Julie Smartfreelance education writer

The Schools White Paper, The Importance of Teaching, was released on 24 November – but what does it mean for you?

DfE white paper

Schools will be freed from centralised bureaucracy and teachers will be allowed to do what they do best – teach, under plans set out in the Schools White Paper.

‘We are putting teachers in the driving seat of school improvement’, said Education Secretary, Michael Gove.

But primary schools will still be actively encouraged to teach reading in the way that the Government wants – using systematic synthetic phonics – and all schools will be expected to reach new higher standards.

The National Curriculum will be reviewed to reduce prescription and there will be an independent review of Key Stage 2 testing to guard against ‘excessive rehearsal’.

The Schools White Paper, The Importance of Teaching, says that schools have become skilled at meeting government targets but have too often been constrained by directives or improvement initiatives.

Log in to your account to read

Don't have an account?

Create your FREE Scholastic account

Reviews

  1. Suzi Bewell
    on 25 November 2010

    Changes to teacher training

    As the CA Leader on the PGCE MFL programme at one of the UK’s top rated Universities, I am horrified by the plans to put more training into schools. The day before the White Paper was published Osted issued a statement that confirms how well HI institutions are doing compared to other more school based approaches. The mind really does boggle. Schools are busy places and our partners already find it hard to do the job of mentoring well and thoroughly under the current system….

    I am also very keen to see what is meant exactly by ‘training schools’.

    S Bewell