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Eco-island: Silverleaf Forest activity 2

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Investigate the features of a deciduous forest and build a large collage representing the woodland.

Keystage 1

Curriculum links: Sc2 4b-c. Art 2a-c.

Forest collage

What to do: Investigate common types of tree found in a deciduous forest, such as maple, beech, oak and chestnut. See if you can find some examples of these trees in your local area and study them carefully. Look at the shape, colour, size and texture of the leaves, the texture and pattern of the bark and the kinds of fruit, seeds, nuts or berries that grow on them.

Build a large forest mural to display what your class has learnt. Begin by carrying out some bark rubbings using paper and crayons and then use these to make the trunks of the trees. Cut other tree trunks from brown felt and foam. On the foam trunks you can draw bark patterns on top. Collect some fresh leaves that haven’t yet dried out and, putting them face down, do a rubbing onto a tissue or sheet of kitchen roll using a fabric crayon. You will find the veins show clearly. You can also make your own leaf stamps by cutting out the leaf shape from thick card and coating it with paint. Don’t forget to stick some real leaves onto your collage too!

Finally, you can cut images of leaves, seeds and fruit from magazines or information sheets printed out on your computer. Add these to your collage to make it a real ‘multi-media’ display!

Completed this activity? Use our show and tell facility to upload your work and help the inhabitants to improve this zone.

Keystage 2

Curriculum links: Sc2 4b-c. Art 2a-c. What to do: Investigate common types of tree found in a deciduous forest, such as maple, beech, oak and chestnut. See if you can find some examples of these trees in your local area and study them carefully. Look at the shape, colour, size and texture of the leaves, the texture and pattern of the bark and the kinds of fruit, seeds, nuts or berries that grow on them.

Build a large forest mural showing just the woodland at this stage. Use a variety of techniques to create the different trees. Carry out some bark rubbings using paper and crayons and then use these to make the trunks of the trees. Cut other tree trunks from brown felt and foam. On the foam trunks you draw bark patterns on top.

Ask the children to think about the value of trees to humans and the environment. They can then write their answers in the form of shape poems that become some of the tree trunks.

Collect some fresh leaves that haven’t yet dried out and, putting them face down, do a rubbing onto a tissue or sheet of kitchen roll using a fabric crayon. You will find the veins show clearly. You can also make your own leaf stamps by cutting out the leaf shape from thick card and coating it with paint. Put paint directly onto the leaves for a different texture of print. Stick some real leaves onto your collage too.

Do some detailed drawings of acorns, conkers and other seeds and fruit from collections you have made or from pictures in books. Cut these out and add them to your collage, as well as some dried, brown leaves on the forest floor.

Finally, you can cut images of leaves and fruit from magazines or information sheets printed on your computer. Add these to your collage and you will be reflecting the vast diversity of the trees in many different ways. Next month we can populate your forest with wildlife!

Completed this activity? Use our show and tell facility to upload your work and help the inhabitants to improve this zone.

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