Golden Rules 3: We are kind and helpful

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By Jenny Mosleyfounder of the Whole-School Quality Circle Time Consultancy. These activities are based on The Handbook of Golden Rules and The Golden Rules Story Set

In the third article of our six-part series, we show you how to encourage kind behaviour

We are kind and helpful

Helpfulness and kindness always involve action. They are something we do – something we do often, but which is very powerful and special. Kindness can only be taught in kind and gentle ways, so we need to teach through example and sprinkle kindness like stardust on all the children in our care. When we do this often enough, a rainbow of ‘prosocial’ behaviour appears and shines through everyone around us. This rainbow can be seen in the way they act towards one another with thoughtfulness, friendliness, unselfishness, respect, consideration, forgiveness and generosity, as some of its wonderful colours.

Every act of kindness is a caring message from one person to others. It is one of the best ways of showing that we care about the people around us and want to play our part in building a strong community in which everyone feels valued and secure.

We know that you are already performing a thousand acts of kindness every day – smiling at your children, complimenting them, giving them encouragement and nurture and the confidence to attempt more and more complicated things. Here is a short selection of activities that you can use to focus their attention on one of the most important golden rules.

Champion child

You will need: chair; gold paper.

What to do

Give every child a turn at being your very special ‘champion child’. Let them wear a cloak and crown. At one stage in the day they can have a wand and make some kind wishes for everyone, such as I’d like us all to have a special time with the parachute. Most importantly, make sure that they are treated especially kindly all day long, and praise the rest of the group for being especially helpful to the champion child. Make a list with the children of all the kind things they can do for each other. Tell them that they need to behave in exactly the way they want to be treated when it is their turn to be the person in the ‘gold light’.

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