Store your resources in your very own folder.

Sign in or sign up today!

Find out more

Time travel for the Nines and under

Add to My Folder

This content has not been rated yet. (Write a review)

By Kevin McCann — Writer and Poet

The lines of a poem can breathe life into events and people of the past: equally, memories of times gone by can breathe life into the lines of a poem. Kevin McCann explains…

timetravelninesandunder.jpg

When I began writing for children, I realised that even though the trappings of my childhood (black and white television, etc) were different from those of today’s children, the things that mattered to me were not.

At seven I believed (secretly) in magic, didn’t like the dark and loved getting presents. I also loved listening to stories about ‘the olden days’. Kings and Queens we learned about in school didn’t seem real. My Grandad’s account of the 1914 Christmas Truce did. He described it all in such graphic detail, that I could see moonlight glinting on the barbed wire, feel the cold mud, hear Silent Night in German drifting across no-man’s land. In my imagination, I was there. Not quite a quick trip in the TARDIS® but the next best thing.

”...imagine what you are writing about. See it and live it.” Ted Hughes Some years ago an Everton school asked me to oversee a local history project. We discovered that Everton, like most place names ending in -ton, began as a Saxon settlement on a riverbank in a heavily forested valley. We talked about the area now and what it would have looked like 1,000 years ago.

Imagination is to space, what memory is to time… C Day Lewis

The children didn’t have any trouble at all imagining trees, birdsong, a clean river, etc. They just remembered their last school outing to a country park. I then provided this frame:

Now Everton is (The sound of) Cars and lorries roaring up and down (The sight of)

Log in to your account to read

Don't have an account?

Create your FREE Scholastic account

Reviews

Advertisements

Advertise here