Store your resources in your very own folder.

Sign in or sign up today!

Find out more

Advice: Meet the parents

Add to My Folder
This item has 5 stars of a maximum 5

Rated 5/5 from 1 rating (Write a review)

By Sue CowleyEducation writer and consultant and part-time supply teacher

Managing even the most difficult of parents can be child’s play with these top tips

Toy people

Image © Rob Belknap/www.istockphoto.com

Although the work of a teacher is mainly in the classroom with the children, parents come as an essential part of the package. Many are supportive, trusting the class teacher as a professional and the school as an organisation. When there are positive partnerships between parents and schools, this boosts the chances of educational success for the children. However, unfortunately, a minority of parents may cause difficulties and fail to support either you or their child. (Please note: in this article the word ‘parent’ means the person who has parental responsibility for the child.)

When there are positive partnerships between parents and schools, this boosts the chances of educational success for the children

The ‘perfect parent’

Consider what a ‘perfect parent’ would look like to help you encourage these attributes in any ‘less than perfect’ ones that you have. The ‘perfect parent’ would:

  • bring up their child to understand boundaries, to enjoy learning, to be independent and to behave appropriately
  • support the work that you do in class, for instance, by reading with their child at home, and ensuring that homework is done on time
  • be happy to volunteer, whether to assist in class or to do some fundraising for the school
  • trust you to do the right things for their child, but also understand that you are human and that you will make mistakes.
Log in to your account to read

Don't have an account?

Create your FREE Scholastic account

Reviews

Advertisements

Advertise here