Store your resources in your very own folder.

Sign in or sign up today!

Find out more

Chinese New Year!

Add to My Folder
This item has 4 stars of a maximum 5

Rated 4/5 from 2 ratings (Write a review)

By Caroline Petherbridge — _freelance education writer and designer_

Celebrate the beginning of the Year of the Tiger with an exploration of Chinese culture and customs

chinese-tiger

Chinese New Year is also known as the Spring Festival and signifies the time to cast away anything bad from the out-going year and bring good luck for the new year. The start of Chinese New Year changes every year because it is based on the lunar calendar that revolves around the phases of the Moon. It typically falls somewhere between 21 January and 20 February; this year it begins on 14 February. Most families celebrate for roughly two weeks. Taking Chinese New Year as a starting point, the following activities cover learning in subjects such as D&T, literacy and numeracy.

1. From the Rat to the Pig

There are many traditions and symbols associated with Chinese New Year. Every year is assigned an animal name according to a repeating cycle: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig. Every 12 years, therefore, the same animal will reappear.

Log in to your account to read

Don't have an account?

Create your FREE Scholastic account

Reviews

  1. Christine
    on 10 January 2013

    year of snake

    ideas for actitites for pre-school children for year of snake

  2. Patricia Haynes
    on 19 February 2010

    Chinese New year

    Found this very useful for information as to what is done with the flowers at New Year. Thank you.

  3. Carol Jensen
    on 22 January 2010

    Carfts

    I am so glad to find this site! I searched for Chinese New Year images but see this is a site worth so much more.